Teaching & Learning

St Patrick's Marist College is  firmly focused on providing a high quality learning environment. It is proud of the academic achievements of the graduating classes and encourages each student to realise their full potential.

The college offers a wide range of courses covering all aspects of the curriculum. This enables each student to select their studies in accordance with their individual abilities.

  • Creative Arts
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      Students explore a range of historical and contemporary art practices. They investigate ways of creating meaning in their own artworks and ways of understanding meaning in the artwork of other artists and designers. Techniques in a range of forms such as drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking and digital media are used with styles such as realism, expressionism and abstraction to resolve student’s ideas about their world.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      In depth studies of historical and contemporary artists and designers extend student understanding of how to create and interpret meaning. Students are provided with opportunities to become more self directing and to develop conceptual strength and innovative individual practices in art making. The concepts and techniques explored in drawing, painting, etching, lino printing, digital media, 3D construction and found object sculpture allow for some specialisation based on student strengths and interests.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Visual Arts involves students in the practices of art making, art criticism and art history. In the Preliminary course students are exposed to more complex and sophisticated historical and contemporary art practices. Student increasingly take on more independent investigations and devise, explore, refine and resolve concepts and techniques in their own artworks culminating in a body of work produced during the HSC course. Visual Design is offered as a one unit course in the Preliminary and HSC year. Students investigate a range of design practices and then design and make their own images and objects that are functional and also aesthetically pleasing.

  • English
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      In Years 7 and 8 the study of English involves the use of the English language in its various textual forms. Students develop precise skills in speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. During Stage 4 students study a wide variety of works of fiction, poetry, film, drama and non-fiction texts.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      English in Year 9 and 10 develops skills to enable students to experiment with ideas and expression, to become active, independent learners, to work with each other and to reflect on their learning. Students further develop precise skills to enable them to speak, listen, read, write, view and represent their ideas critically. During Stage 5 students study a wide variety of works of fiction, poetry, film, drama and non-fiction texts.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Standard English

      The preliminary and HSC Standard courses are designed for students to explore language forms, features and structure of texts in a range of personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts. The course allows students to develop sound practices of investigation and analysis required for adult life, including the world of work as well as post-school training and education. Students are required to study at least four types of text one drawn from each of the following categories: prose fiction, drama, poetry, nonfiction/film/media/multimedia texts.

      Advanced English

      The Preliminary and HSC Advanced courses are designed for students to explore language forms, features and structures of texts in a range of personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts. The course allows students to foster an appreciation of aesthetic values and provide students with opportunities for enhancing their understanding of literary expression. Students are required to study at least five types of text drawn from each of the following categories: Shakespearean drama, prose fiction, drama/film, poetry and nonfiction/media/multimedia.

      Fundamentals of English

      The Fundamentals of English course aims to address the particular literacy needs of students. The course is offered only to students studying Preliminary Standard English as a way of supporting their understanding of the forms, features, structures and functions of language. Students will enhance their skills in responding and composing a range of texts characteristic of those they will encounter in English and other courses.

      English (Extension)

      The Preliminary and HSC English (Extension) courses enable students who are accomplished, analytical and imaginative in their use of English to refine their understanding and appreciation of the cultural roles and significance of texts. This course provides students with opportunity to pursue areas of interest with increased independence and to theorise about the processes of responding to and composing texts.

  • History
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      History is designed to enhance and improve student learning. It gives students opportunities to produce the work that leads to development of their knowledge, understanding and skills

      Much of the focus of the History curriculum is on developing students research skills, the ability to reflect on events and make judgments and then to be able to communicate this information.

      History in Stage 4 is mandatory and has been designed to provide students with an understanding from ancient times to medieval history and colonisation of new countries. There is a focus on acquiring the skills required for studying history. In Year 7 the students learn about how historians investigate the past, Ancient Egypt, the colonisation of Australia and Aboriginal Society. The Year 8 students study Vikings, the Middle Ages and American Indians.

      Mandatory History in Stage 5 is designed to provide students with an understanding of Australian History and civics and citizenship. In Year 9 students learn about Federation, World War One, the Depression and World War Two. Year 10 students study Australia in the post World War Two period: The Vietnam War Era; Changing Rights and Freedoms; People Power and Politics; Australia’s social and cultural history.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Elective

      In Year 9 students may chose Elective History as an optional course. The Year 9 Course is a combination of Modern and Ancient History and covers the following topics:

      Murders, Mysteries and Assassinations; Archaeology and Ancient China. In Year 10 students investigate: Terrorism; Slavery; Genocide and the Aztecs.

      As part of the Preliminary Course and the HSC students may study Ancient History, Modern History and Society and Culture for two years. All subjects are 2 Units.

      An exciting aspect of the new Ancient and Modern History syllabuses is that students get to complete an Historical Investigation on a topic of their choice. This is a very popular unit and it also helps to develop the students research and essay writing skills for the HSC. Ancient History topics concentrate on Archaeology, Ancient Greece, Ancient Egyptian Society, as well as the core topic of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

      The Modern History course focuses on Twentieth Century people and events. In Year 11 students complete a variety of case studies: Civil Rights in the USA; the Decline and fall of the Romanovs etc. The core topic for Year 12 is World War One. Some of the other topics are: The Conflict in Indochina and Nazi Germany.

      The Society and Culture course is about how the interaction of people, society, culture and the environment shape human behaviour. In Year 11 students learn about how people communicate and make comparisons with other cultures. A major unit for Year 12 students is the Personal Interest Project. The students develop and research their own topic and write a 5,000 word report which is submitted to the Board of Studies.

      Students who excel in either Ancient History or Modern History may choose to study Extension History in Year 12. This subject involves the study of historiography and one major case study. It is an excellent preparation for university as students learn how to work independently as well as improve their research and essay writing skills.

    • Stage 6 Years 11 and 12 Modern History

      The study of Modern History Stage 6 has a distinctive role in the school curriculum as it challenges students to consider the great social, technological, economical, political and moral transformations from the late eighteenth century to the present. It requires students to analyse the causes, progress and effects of these transformations and, finally, to make judgements about them. Modern History Stage 6 is especially relevant to the lives of students, as the events and issues that form its content are, in many cases, still current.
      The study of Modern History Stage 6 also contributes to the development of skills that are of great importance in today's workforce. The fluent communication of thoughts and ideas gleaned from the critical analysis of primary and secondary sources is a sought after skill. The ability to deconstruct texts and narratives, pose intelligent questions, test hypotheses and make critical use of information technologies is essential to living and working in the twenty first century.

      Year 11 Preliminary Course

      Part 1 - Depth Studies
      Part 11 - Historical Investigation
      Part 111 - Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

      Year 12 HSC Course​

      Part 1 - Core Study: World War 1 1914-1918
      Part 11 - National Study 1918-1939
      Part III - Personalities in the Twentieth Century
      Part IV - International Studies in Peace & Conflict

    • Stage 6 Years 11 & 12 Society and Culture
      The central concern of Society and Culture Stage 6 is the interaction of persons, societies, cultures, environments and time. Society and Culture draws on cross-disciplinary concepts and social research methodologies from anthropology, communication, cultural studies, media studies, philosophy, social ecology and sociology.Society and Culture has direct relevance to the immediate needs of students and to their future lives by enabling students to develop understanding of:
      • themselves
      • their own society and culture
      • the societies and cultures of others

      Preliminary Course

      • The Social and Cultural World
      • Personal and Social Identity
      • Intercultural Communication

      HSC Course

      Core

      • Personal Interest Project
      • Social and Cultural Continuity and Change
      Depth Studies
      Two​ to be chosen from the following:
      • Popular Culture
      • Belief Systems
      • Equality and Difference
      • Work and Leisure
    • Stage 6 Years 11 & 12 Ancient History
      The study of history is an inquiry to past experience that helps make the present intelligible. A study of the past is invaluable, for to be unaware of history is to be ignorant of those forces that have shaped our social and physical worlds. Through the study of Ancient History gives students an understanding of the possibilities and limitations of comparing past to present and present to past by exposing them to a variety of perspectives on key events and issues. It also gives them opportunities to develop their perspectives on the origins and influence of ideas, values and behaviors that are still relevant in the modern world.

      Preliminary Course 

      Part I: (a) Investigating the Past: History, Archaeology and Science
                 (b) Case Studies
      Part II: Studies of Ancient Societies, Sites and Sources
      Part III: Historical Investigation

      HSC Course

      Part I: (Core): Cities of Vesuvius - Pompeii and Herculaneum
      Part II: Ancient Societies
      Part III: Personality in their Time
      Part IV: Historical Period

      The course requires study from at least TWO of the following areas:
      1. Egypt
      2. Near East
      3. Greece
      4 Rome

  • HSIE
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8 Geography

      Stage 4 Geography incorporates learning related to global geography and the interaction of human and physical elements of the environment in a global context.

       

      Year 7 Geography includes a study of:

      • The physical elements of environments
      • The human elements of environments
      • Maps
      • Geographical research which includes fieldwork and
      • World Heritage Site studies
      • Global Geography – a study of desert and tropical rainforests

       

      Year 8 Geography includes a story of globalisation

      • Global inequality
      • Global organisations
      • Threatened habitats.
    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Geography

      Stage 5 Geography incorporates learning related to the Australian context rather than a global context and looks at the interaction of human and physical geography in a local context rather than a global context.

       

      Year 9 Geography includes the study of:

      • The Australian continent
      • Physical characteristics that make Australia unique
      • The study of one natural hazard as specified by the Board of Studies
      • Study of communities.

       

      Year 10 Geography includes the study of:

      • Geographical issues affecting Australian environments. Two geographical issues are studies from a range of issues provide by the Board of Studies.
      • The place of Australia in the world
      • Australia’s regional and global links. One link is studied from the range of links provided by the Board of Studies
      • Future challenges for Australia: Population
      • Human rights and reconciliation.
    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Commerce

      Commerce provides the knowledge, skills, understanding and values that form the foundation on which young people can make sound decisions on consumer, financial, business, legal and employment issues. The study of Commerce develops financial literacy which enables students to participate in the financial and legal systems in an informed way.

       

      Year 9 Commerce includes the study of:

      • Consumer Choice
      • Personal Finance
      • Investing
      • Running a Business
      • Promoting & Selling

       

      Year 10 Commerce includes the study of:

      • Employment Issues
      • Law & Society
      • Law in Action
      • Political Involvement
    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Geography

      Geography is an investigation of the world which provides an accurate description and interpretation of the varied character of the earth and its peoples. It is a key discipline through which students develop the ability to recognize and understand environmental change and the interactions which take place in our world.

       

      The Preliminary course studies:

      • Biophysical Interactions
      • Global Challengers
      • Senior Geography Project
      • The HSC course studies:
      • Ecosystems at Risk
      • Urban Places
      • People & Economic Activity
    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Business

      Studies Business Studies enhances students’ confidence and ability to participate effectively, not only as members of the business world, but as informed citizens dealing with issues coming from business activity that impacts on their lives.

      The Preliminary Business Studies course focuses primarily on the domestic business sector rather than the international markets. It is based upon a study of four compulsory topics and the completion of a Business research Task:

      • The Nature of Business
      • Key Business Functions
      • Establishing a Business Plan
      • Developing a Business Plan

       

      The HSC course is based on five compulsory topics and includes a study of:

      • Business Management & Change
      • Financial Planning & Management
      • Marketing
      • Employment relations
      • Global Business.
    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Economics

      Economic decisions have an important influence on the quality of life experienced by people throughout the world. The study of Economics can help individuals and societies make choices that assist them to improve their quality of life

      Preliminary Economics The Preliminary course is essentially microeconomic in nature i. e. it focuses on aspects of economic behaviour of consumers, business and governments. Much of this behaviour is influenced by the operation of markets and so the labour market and the financial market are studied in some detail. The Preliminary course studies:

      • Introduction To Economics
      • Consumers and Business
      • Market
      • Labour Markets
      • Financial Markets

      HSC Economics The HSC course focuses on the management of the economy. It examines the external framework in which the Australian economy operates, investigates the impact of the global economy on the Australian economy and the link between economic issues and the management of the Australian economy.

       

      The HSC course studies:

      • The Global Economy
      • Australia; s Place In The Global Economy
      • Economic Issues
      • Economic Policies and Management
    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Legal Studies

      Legal Studies has a significant impact on student’s confidence in approaching and accessing the legal system and provides them with a better appreciation and understanding of the relationship between social and legal structures in society.

      Preliminary Legal Studies has the themes of justice, law and society; culture, values and ethics as well as conflict and cooperation running through the course which studies:

      • Part I – The Legal System
      • Part II – The Individual And The State
      • Part III – The Law In Focus

      HSC Legal Studies has the themes of continuity and change, legal processes and institutions and the effectiveness of the legal system running through the course which studies:

      • Part I – Law and Society
      • Part II – Focus Study: Crime
      • Part III – Additional Focus Studies
  • Mathematics
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      Mathematics is compulsory for all students from Years 7 and 8. In Stage 4 there are five areas of study: Number, Patterns and Algebra, Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry. Whilst all students complete the same programme of work, additional topics are given to extend and challenge the more capable students. Mathsonline is a free Mathematics programme that is used frequently in class and at home. It enables students to review, assess and extend their competency in Years 7 and 8 Mathematics topics. Students will complete the National Assessment Program (NAPLAN) to assess their numeracy skills.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      Mathematics is compulsory for all students from Years 9 and 10.

      In Stage 5 there are three courses available for students. Stage 5.1(General Maths), Stage 5.2 (Intermediate Maths) and Stage 5.3 (Advanced Maths). These courses have five areas of study; Number, Patterns and Algebra, Data, Measurement, Space and Geometry. Students in Year 9 will complete the National Assessment Program (NAPLAN) to assess their numeracy skills. Students have the opportunity to complete in mathematics competitions. Year 9 and 10 students also participate in the Mathsonline programme. Students may be selected in Years 9 and 10 to participate in the Accelerated Mathematics Program. This program allows the students to complete the HSC course Mathematics (2 units) in Year 11. Students who are selected start the programme whilst they are in Years 9 and 10.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Mathematics in not compulsory for students in Years 11 and 12. The following courses that are offered to students in Year 11 and 12.

       

      General Mathematics

      This is a two year course and focuses on Mathematical skills and techniques that have direct application to everyday activities. The course has five areas of study, with an emphasis on applications and modeling tasks.

       

      Mathematics

      This is a two year course and extends the skills acquired in Stage 5 to further aspects of Mathematics that are applicable to the real world. Calculus skills are an important part of the course and are used to investigate the properties of various functions.

       

      Extension 1 Mathematics

      This is a two year course and includes the whole of the Mathematics course. This course is intended for students who have demonstrated a mastery of Stage 5 Mathematics.

      Extension 2 Mathematics(Year 12 only): This is a one year course and represents a distinctly high level of school Mathematics involving the development of considerable manipulation skills and a high degree of understanding of the fundamental ideas of Algebra and Calculus.

  • Performing Arts
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      Year 7 Music

      Performance: In Year 7 Music, each student learns to read music whilst learning to play simple melodies on either the electric keyboard or acoustic guitar (or may continue with another instrument if he/she is having music tuition). Composition: Students learn to use a music software program to compose a pentatonic song which has at least four layers (one of which is improvised live as their computer music is heard). Listening: Students study and listen to the instruments of the orchestra and voice types as well as the musical concepts (such as volume and speed) and how they are used to create pieces of music.

       


      Year 8 Music

      Performance: The focus of year 8 performance pieces is on learning to play rock songs as an ensemble: learning to play the melody and accompanying chords on their instruments; and learning to play the basic rock beat on the drum kit. Composition: Students use music software to compose a rock song on computer enabling each of them to hear the melody, chords, bass line and drum kit parts in the music they compose – this is mixed and recorded by the students, ready to burn to CD. Listening: Students learn about the musical concepts, notation types and structures found in rock music as well as how chords and melodies are constructed.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      Music: Additional Studies Course

      MUSIC: Years 9 and 10 Elective Music: Students may elect to study Music throughout year 9 and 10. Music is studied in the context of a wide range of topics which include, but are not limited to, Australian music; Rock; Jazz; Music of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic Periods; Music for Film/Television; the Influence of Technology on Music.

      In class, students have three equally weighted areas of learning: Performing refers to participating in any form of practical music making in solo and/or ensemble situations. The development of performance skills is fostered by providing performance experience in a variety of styles and genres according to individual needs, interests, abilities and school resources, including various types of audio and music technology equipment. Students have opportunities to perform at assemblies and at concerts.

      Composing refers to organising sound. The development of skills in composing results from continued involvement in a wide range of experiences in classroom activities, including both individual and group work. Students continue to develop knowledge and skills in the use of music software recording their compositions on computer or with audio equipment. Listening refers to the ability to hear, understand and respond to a wide range of musical styles, periods and genres. Listening involves the ability to discriminate between sounds and to make judgements about their use in a range of repertoire. Additionally, it includes studying musical scores to understand how composers have used and manipulated the concepts of music in their works.

       


      Drama: Additional Studies Course

      DRAMA: Years 9 and 10 Elective Drama: Students may elect to study Drama throughout year 9 and 10. In studying Drama, students will develop knowledge, understanding and skills, individually and collaboratively, in the three practices of Making, Performing and Appreciating: Making refers to participating in the creation of drama and theatre process work.

      Students develop and explore imagining and creating fictional situations in both dramatic and theatrical environments. Improvisation and playbuilding are key methods of making which involve a group of students collaborating to devise their own work. Performing refers to students actively engaging in acting and performing drama and theatre for different audiences. They perform devised and scripted drama using a variety of performance techniques, dramatic forms and theatrical conventions to engage an audience Appreciating refers to students responding to, inquiring into, investigating and studying a range of drama and theatre experiences. They investigate the meaning and function of drama and theatre in reflecting the personal social, cultural, aesthetic and political aspects of the human experience

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Year 11

       

      Music 1: Preliminary Course

      The pre-requisite for this course is Mandatory Music from Years 7 & 8. Contexts Students choose 3 topics from a huge range: Music Technology; Religious Music; An Instrument and Its Repertoire; Rock and Popular Music; Music for Film, Television, Radio and Multimedia; Music in Education; Music of the 20th/21st Centuries; and a variety of Australian music (to name just some).

      The Preliminary Course covers the following four learning areas each weighted equally:

      Performance: Performance refers to participation in any form of practical music making. Students have a variety of experiences in performing: solo and as part of an ensemble; music of various genres, periods and styles; music representative of the contexts studied; performing compositions, arrangements and improvisations; with different types of audio and music technology.

      Composition: Composition refers to the organisation of sounds. Composing includes experimenting; improvising; arranging; structuring; notating; using different types of audio and computer technology. Musicology: Musicology refers to the study of musical styles and genres from a number of perspectives. These include the historical, the sociological, the notational and the analytical. Students have experiences in: identifying and commenting on the concepts of music; analysing; collecting information; using different types of technology; investigating some of the cultural contexts of music.

      Aural: Aural refers to the ability to discriminate between sounds and to make judgements about their use in a wide range of musical styles, periods and genres. Students develop listening skills in order to recognise, analyse and comment on the concepts of music; the use of technology; music of various cultures; unity, contrast and style.

       


      Drama: Preliminary Course

      The Preliminary Drama course comprises: Improvisation, Playbuilding and Acting In Improvisation, students learn how to work spontaneously to create characters and situations, explore ideas and issues, and use, and experiment with, dramatic elements and structures. When working with scripted material, students learn how to use improvisation to develop understanding of issues, themes, characters and dramatic forms and styles.

      In Playbuilding, students learn to collaborate in devising original presentations using dramatic elements, structures and performance styles. Students learn to use production elements such as costume, sound and lighting. In Acting, students learn to perform drama and theatre to an audience. Students learn how to use the voice and body, in conjunction with the mind and the imagination, to transform themselves as actor into a fictitious character.

      Elements of Production in Performance Students learn about rehearsal scheduling and processes including adapting to different performance spaces and venues when developing original or scripted material for performance. They learn about and use the technical terminology of the stage and theatre.

      Students learn about the roles of the director and the designer through practice, research and writing about their experiences. They learn how the elements of production such as set, properties, costume, sound and lighting can enhance their production when transferring from developmental stages to performance. They learn about the roles of stage management and crew, front-of-house organisation and publicity.

      Practical skills in these roles will be gained from taking on various responsibilities during class performances throughout the course, to develop practical skills As audience members, students learn to observe, comment on and write about directorial and design concepts, acting techniques and audience reactions. They will learn to apply their knowledge and experiences of theatrical styles and forms to analyse the social and cultural contexts of performances and the effectiveness of productions.

      Theatrical Traditions and Performance Styles. All performance, however old or new, occurs within an historical, social and cultural context. Students learn about the importance of these contexts and develop performance skills through exploring the differences in performance spaces, acting techniques, dramatic structures and theatrical conventions.

      In studying Theatrical Traditions and Performance Styles, students learn experientially. This occurs through practical workshops using improvisation and playbuilding and a variety of texts, scripts or extracts from scripts. In this work they will use dramatic and theatrical techniques appropriate to the tradition and style.

       


      Year 12

       

      Music 1: HSC Course

      Music 1 is a fabulous Music course because it allows students of all abilities and interests to work along side each other at their own individual pace; and to specialize in their strengths and interests for their HSC examination.

      Contexts Students choose 3 topics from a huge range: Music Technology; Religious Music; An Instrument and Its Repertoire; Rock and Popular Music; Music for Film, Television, Radio and Multimedia; Music in Education; Music of the 20th/21st Centuries; and a variety of Australian music (to name just some).

      The HSC Course assesses the following areas: Internal Mark Each student is assessed on a Core Composition and Core Musicology task (each worth 10%) ; Core Performance (10%) ; Aural (25%) and 3 Electives (each worth 15%). Each student ‘elects’ to complete any combination of the activities of composition, performance or a viva voce (discussion of an area of research). External Mark Each student continues to work and improve upon his/her Aural skills (30%) ; Core Performance and 3 Electives (totalling 70%). This means keen performers can earn up to 70% of their external HSC mark for performance.

      Explanation of the parts of the course: Aural – is an activity that requires students to listen to and analyse music of a wide variety of styles. Musicology – is the study of a particular style of music and musical theory. In senior Music, this knowledge might be presented in the form of a ‘viva voce’ – a 10 minute discussion with examiners on a chosen area of special research (along with a few recorded excerpts of music).

      Composition – to create or arrange a piece of music either in a live improvised form or as a pre-composed computer notated format. Performance – the performing of music as a soloist or ensemble member often in front of an audience.

       


      Drama: HSC Course

      The HSC course comprises: Australian Drama and Theatre (Core component) In Australian Drama and Theatre students learn about aspects of drama and theatre in Australian societies and cultures, past and present, through study of Contemporary Australian Theatre.

      Studies in Drama and Theatre Studies in Drama and Theatre involves students learning about aspects of drama and theatre in societies and cultures, past and present. Productions and works for this topic may be drawn from Australian and non-Australian material. Students are to study ONE of seven topics selected by the teacher

      In Australian Drama and Theatre and Studies in Drama and Theatre students learn through theoretical study about the themes and issues, the historical, social, cultural and political contexts of particular forms, styles, movements or traditions of theatre, or the work of a specific artist, practitioner, group or company. They learn about dramatic and theatrical structures, forms, styles and conventions and gain practical experience of them through workshops culminating in presentations and performances using relevant acting techniques, characterisation, performance styles and spaces. Students learn to analyse, interpret and synthesise their research through discussion and debate, and through structuring their opinions in written responses.

      The Group Performance (Core component) Each student learns to collaborate with a group to devise and perform in a piece of original theatre. They learn how to work cooperatively in creating dramatic works, presenting their own opinions confidently and listening to the ideas of others. They develop their Group Performance using a variety of playbuilding techniques and approaches. They learn to structure their work using dramatic elements and theatrical conventions. They learn how to edit and refine their work through rehearsal, evaluation and editing. In their performance they use expressive skills that are appropriate to the chosen style or form. They learn how to realise and sustain a role and how to establish a relationship with the audience.

      The Individual Project. In the Individual Project students learn how to initiate and present a project in an area of interest developed during study in the Preliminary course. They use the knowledge, skills and experiences acquired in the Preliminary course to select an area in which to specialise.

      The Individual Project will take one of the following forms:

      • Critical Analysis (Director’s Folio, Theatrical Review, Applied Research)
      • Design (Costume, Lighting, Set, Promotion)
      • Performance
      • Scriptwriting
      • Video Drama.

      The content for the Individual Projects in Critical Analysis (Director’s Folio) and Design (Set, Costume, Lighting, Publicity) will be based on one of the texts in a separately published list, which may change in total or in part every two years. Individual Projects will be determined by negotiation between the student and the teacher at the beginning of the HSC course.

  • PDHPE
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      Personal Development Health and Physical Education contributes in a significant way to a student’s development as a whole person. The theoretical program allows young people to explore issues integral to teenagers through a range of engaging units which enhance resilience and allow students to take a positive approach to managing their lives.

      The diverse program also offers a range of practical activities and sports, including; invasion games, dance, fitness testing, net/court games, athletics, orienteering, kicking and catching skill development and tagging games. This allows all students the opportunity to improve their capacity to move with skill and confidence. 

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      Personal Development, Health and Physical Education builds on our student’s skills and theoretical understanding. Students participate in a diverse range of sports and activities including; Latino Dance, Gymnastics, Aerobics/Boxercise, Target Sports and Modified Games. Exposure to a variety of sports increases student motivation and hopefully leads to lifelong participation in Sport and Fitness. At the peak of adolescents, students engage in meaningful and highly relevant topics relating to Careers, Drug Use, Safe Parties, Sexual Health, Nutrition and Mental Health. Our students have a very positive approach to all aspects of PDHPE and are actively engaged in lessons. This helps students grow to their full potential.

      Physical Activity and Sports Studies (PASS) is a very popular elective course which runs during year 9 and Year 10. It allows students with a strong academic ability coupled with a passion for sport the opportunity to excel in this area. Student’s attain detailed theoretical understanding of Sport Science and exposure to a range of new sports; including Archery, Mini Olympics, Outdoor Education and Fitness Circuits for example. A few of the many highlights of this course are an Outdoor Trek, Wheelchair Basketball and taking on the role of a Teacher/Coach to teach a sport to local Primary students. This has been a positive and rewarding experience for all involved. 

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Sport, Life and Recreation (SLR)

      Sport, Lifestyle and Recreation is a 1 unit course which runs during year 11. It has two major focuses;

      • Sports Administration – which involves forming an actual orgainsation, having meetings, promotions, fundraising and putting on various sporting events throughout the year within the College. This has taught students vital skills in both team work and leadership and has resulted in thousands of dollars being raised for charity.
      • Application of Games and Sport – Involves both coaching and participation in a range of team and individual sports throughout the year. 

       


      2 Unit PDHPE 

      2 Unit Personal Development, Health and Physical Education has grown significantly over recent years with over 40 students in both the Year 11 and Year 12 course. We are attracting quality students who are achieving outstanding results – 40 Band 6 in the past four years in the HSC. Students learn about key personal and community health issues, along with the factors which affect and can improve performance, Sports Medicine and First Aid.

      This course is highly relevant to young people and assists their capacity to take a productive role in society – making good citizens.

  • Religion
    • Overview
      Religious Education is foundational to all learning at St Patrick’s Marist College. Our education seeks to prepare students for active involvement as members of the human community, bringing a practical knowledge, appreciation and celebration of Catholic faith and spirituality in the Marist tradition.'

      Religious Education strives to relate all learning to the Gospel of Jesus so that students develop sensitivity to each other, expressed in service and social justice. The worth and dignity of each person are recognised in the responsibility each has to one another.

      Religious Education is an integral component of life at St Patrick’s Marist College. As part of the Diocesan guidelines, St Patrick’s Marist integrates the Sharing Our Story curriculum within the Religious domain. Students are engaged in six lessons per fortnight of curriculum from years 7 to 10.

      In year 11 and 12, students undertake the HSC topic Studies of Religion or Catholic Studies. Our Religious Education curriculum, Sharing Our Story, is supported by texts entitled, To Know, Worship and Love and also an online and interactive program entitled, Understanding Faith.

      In Catholic Studies, students will develop an understanding of the nature of God, the development of Catholicism, the place of social justice in our world, personal moral development, the centrality of the scriptures, worship and sacraments.

      The overall aim of the program is to assist students towards:

      • Making sense of everyday life experiences in the broader contexts of mystery, complexity, confusion and awe.
      • Gaining access to and understanding the scriptures, the traditions of the Catholic community, its stories, its experiences and its teachings
      • Celebrating with others the mystery and life of the Risen Christ
      • Responding to the activity of God in their lives and in the whole of creation
      • Personal development of conscience and moral choices
      • Awareness of issues and participation in social justice
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      During this stage students engage in various units of work that express the Catholic tradition, incorporating other World Religions as examples of other living faiths around us. All units seek to develop in students a religious literacy which skills them in mind, heart and hands to live as Christian Catholics in our world. The various foundational elements which are taught and explored are; God, Jesus Christ, Scripture, Morality, Sacraments, Saints, Prayer, Liturgy, and the Christian Life. In supporting the teaching and learning of these units students are also engaged in a Spirituality Day, excursions to Religious venues such as St Patrick’s Church Hill, St Mary’s Cathedral and the Great Synagogue.

      In supporting the teaching and learning of these units students are also engaged in a Spirituality Day, excursions to Religious venues such as St Mary MacKillop Place and a Social Justice Day workshop.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      During this stage students engage various units of work that express the Catholic tradition focusing more attention to Church History and Morality and Ethical Decision making, the lives of Saints and the New Testament and Issues of Social Justice. In preparation for senior school, students in Religious Education incorporate into their studies PBL, Essay writing skills, Higher order thinking startegies and Oral presentations.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      Studies of Religion

      Studies of Religion (SOR) 1 or 2 Unit is a Board of Studies course which seeks to promotes an awareness, understanding and application of the Nature of Religion and the influence of religious traditions, beliefs and practices on individuals and society, with an emphasis on the Australian context. Studies of Religion 1 Unit focuses on an in depth study of Christianity and Judaism. Studies of Religion 2 Unit adds the following units of study – Islam, Religion and Non-Religion and Religion and Peace.

       


      Catholic Studies

      Catholic Studies is a Board endorsed course. As a faith based course specific to Catholicism and the interaction of Catholicism with other traditions and social trends, it supports students faith lives as well as continuing the religious literacy for Christian Catholic living as young adults. The course integrates aspects of learning about Indigenous spirituality, with a specific emphasis on Sacred Texts and Jesus Christ in history, Pilgrimage, Religion in Australia and the Christian Vocation.

    • Assessment

      Students will be assessed using a range of assessment tasks, including:

      • Research assignments
      • Examinations
      • Individual oral presentations
      • Group tutorials
      • Bible skills tasks
      • Essay and report writing
      • Peer and self-assessment
      • Literacy-based tasks
    • Marist Education

      The Marist Tradition

      The tradition of Catholic education that is known as 'Marist' was begun by a French priest, Marcellin Champagnat, in 1817. Today, Marist schools, colleges and universities are found in over seventy countries around the world, leading hundreds of thousands of young people to what Marcellin believed each of them could – good Christians and good citizens.

      Take every possible care of the poorest, the most ignorant, and the dullest children; show them every kindness, interrogate them often, and be careful to show on all occasions that you esteem them, and love them all the more, because they are less favoured with the gifts of fortune and of nature. Destitute children are in a school, what the sick are in a house - subjects of blessing and prosperity when they are looked upon with the eyes of faith, and treated as the suffering members of Jesus Christ.'
      Marcellin Champagnat

       

      Features of Marist schools

      One summary of the distinctive educational style of Marist schools describes the following qualities as its defining features:

      A spirit defined by a sense of family

      • love of children and a closeness to them
      • “To educate children first you must love them, and love them equally”
      • warm, down-to-earth, unpretentious relationships

       

      A love of our work

      • an enthusiasm for the work of the school
      • generosity of heart and without any attention-seeking
      • the honouring of all work and those who undertake it

       

      Simplicity

      • this is a central gospel value and distinguishing Marist characteristic
      • a preference for simplicity of method, of expression and action
      • transparency and genuineness in relationships, ease of relationship

       

      Presence

      • “being present” and “good example”: the two pillars of Marcellin’s approach to education
      • pedagogy of presence: immersion in the lives of young people, looking for opportunities and ways to be with them for extended time

       

      In the way of Mary

      • Mary is the perfect model of a Marist educator
      • openness to the action and will of God, like Mary of the Annunciation
      • selflessness, humility and optimism like Mary of the Visitation

      While all of the above qualities may be considered as characteristics of any good Catholic school, it is the subtly distinctive mix of them and their interplay which defines the culture of St Patricks Marist College.

    • REMAR

      Remar is a dynamic and vibrant Marist youth ministry program currently running at Trinity that aims to inspire young people to live out the values of the Gospel. Remar is a unique opportunity for students in year 10 to 12 that seeks to form Christian leaders who are prepared to stand in solidarity with those experiencing disadvantage and injustice, and who are motivated to take action. The Remar movement connects students with our Marist traditions and looks to Saint Marcellin Champagnat as a model navigator who embraced in his life the values of Jesus, which we are called to actively live out each day.

      Remar was founded by a Colombian Marist Brother, Br Nestor Quiceno, who hoped to create a voluntary group that would lead to a renewal of the Marist Charism. This voluntary group has expanded to a youth ministry program that currently operates in most states and territories of Australia, New Zealand and South America.

      Remar is a very practical and ‘hands on’ ministry opportunity for students at the College. In Remar students are encouraged to discover who they are and the type of person they wish to be.

      This is achieved through the four components:

      1. Community: the formation of a strong sense of group identity (through camps, fortnightly meetings and group ministry activities)
      2. Skills and Knowledge: the development of individual leadership skills
      3. Ministry and service: involvement in service and ministry to the community. This allows students to put their faith into action
      4. Faith Development: exploration of the Christian faith and how this might influence our call to be people of justice

      Remar is passionately creating young Christian leaders who make a difference in our community.

  • Science
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8

      Science is a mandatory course for Stage 4 (Year 7 & 8) and Stage 5 ( Year 9 & 10) students in New South Wales. The course is set to engage and challenge students in an effort to maximise their learning.

      Wherever possible, the subject material allows the student to learn and apply their knowledge and skills to real life situations.

       

      The range of topics includes:

      • Year 7: Living Things, Cells, Forces, Earth and Its Resources, Separating Mixtures and Energy
      • Year 8: Introductory Chemistry, Bushfires, Food & Digestion, Astronomy, Electrical Circuits, Plants and Human Body Systems.

       

      These topics allow for a variety of lessons to be taught with an emphasis on the practical skills associated with the work.

      A guided Research Project is carried out during the course of Year 8. Students are required to carry out research in a nominated topic. A scaffold is provided to assist the students in undertaking the research and writing up the scientific report.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10

      Science is a mandatory course for Stage 4 (Year 7 & 8) and Stage 5 ( Year 9 & 10) students in New South Wales. The course is set to engage and challenge students in an effort to maximise their learning.

      Wherever possible, the subject material allows the student to learn and apply their knowledge and skills to real life situations.

       

      The range of topics include:

      • Year 9: Origin of the Universe, Electricity at Work, Reproduction, Light, Dynamic Earth, Coordination and Control, Earth’s Resources and Nuclear Technology
      • Year 10: Global Issues, Genetics, Waves and Communication, Chemistry, Microbes and Disease, Motion and Evolution.
        •  

          An extensive Research Project is carried out during the course of Year 10. Students are required to do extensive research on an aspect of science which interests them and present a scientific report based on their research data.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12

      This stage involves the Higher School Certificate program of study. The course structure is made up of two components:

      • Preliminary Course – studied in Year 11
      • HSC Course – studied in Year 12.

       

      Subjects offered in stage 6 include:

      • Biology
      • Chemistry
      • Physics
      • Senior Science
      • Earth & Environmental Science

       

      The practical experiences are an essential component of both the Preliminary and HSC Courses. A minimum of 80 hours of practical/field will be carried out by students in these courses.

      Practical experiences develop each student’s ability to plan and conduct investigations and communicate information.

  • TAS
    • Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8 Technology (Mandatory)

      Technology (Mandatory) is a compulsory course in Years 7 and 8 that integrates both procedural and conceptual knowledge based on a holistic view of design. Students learn about technologies and use a range of materials, tools and techniques in the production of a variety of design projects in the areas of study: Built Environments, Products and Information and Communication.

      Students document each design process in a design folio which focus on designing, producing and evaluating. Currently our Technology programs include units of work in these design specifications:

      • Interior Design
      • Fashion Design
      • Landscape Design
      • Food Design Structural Design
      • Industrial Design
      • Promotional Design
      • Digital Media Design

      and implementing the following technologies: food, graphics, media, metals, model making, plant production, textile, information and timber.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Food Technology

      Food Technology provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to various units of work undertaken throughout years 9 and 10. Units include: Food Selection and Health, Food in Australia and Food for Special Occasions in Year 9 and Food Service and Catering, Food for Special Needs and Food Product Development in Year 10.

      Within each unit, students take part in relevant practical experiences that require them to design, produce and evaluate food products.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Industrial Technology (Timber)

      Industrial Technology Timber provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in woodworking. The students learn to use a wide range of hand and power tools and develop knowledge and skills in woodworking processes with an emphasis on Occupational Health and Safety. A priority of this course is for students to become confident and competent when working in the building industry. Therefore this subject is ideal for those students wishing to take on a trade after leaving school or continuing study in Senior School in Industrial Technology or Design and Technology.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Information & Software Technology

      Information and Software Technology assists students to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills to solve computing problems in real life contexts.

      Students develop information and software technology solutions through project work, individually and collaboratively. This is done throughout the units of work which include; Artificial Intelligence, Authoring and Multimedia, Database Design, Digital Media, Internet and Website Development, Robotics and Software Development and Programming.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Textile Technology

      Textiles Technology is an elective stage 5 course that provides students with a broad knowledge of the historical, cultural and contemporary aspects of Textiles.

      Students explore the three areas of study:

      • Design
      • Properties and Performance of textiles
      • Textiles and Society

       

      This is covered through a range of student projects and investigations into the work of textile designers. The textile projects give Students the opportunity to be creative, independent learners through the investigation of the textile focus areas:

      • Apparel
      • Furnishing
      • Costume
      • Textile Arts
      • Non-Apparel
    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Food Technology

      This course provides students with a broad knowledge of Food Technology which relates to the activities and knowledge required to meet food needs and wants.

      Students develop skills relating to food including ability to research, analyse, communicate and experiment as well as design, implement and evaluate solutions to a range of food situations.

      The Preliminary course includes: Food Availability and Selection Food Quality Nutrition

      The HSC Course includes: The Australian Food Industry Food Manufacture Food Product Development Contemporary Food Issues: Nutrition

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Industrial Technology (Metal)

      Industrial Technology – Metal provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the metal industry. In this course, students take part in a number of practical based experiences that occupy majority of the course time. These experiences involve students learning about and applying skills in metal machining, fabrication and art metalwork.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Textiles & Design

      Textiles and Design is a Stage 6 Elective Course. The preliminary Course provides students with a knowledge of design through research and experimentation of the elements and principles of design. Students develop a knowledge of fibre, yarn and fabric structure in the Properties and Performance unit of work, as well as a broad historical perspective with a study on the Australian Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Allied Industries. Students develop skills in design creativity and project Management, with the completion of two textile projects.

      The HSC Course continues to develop knowledge and understanding in the areas of Design, Properties and Performance and the Australian Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Allied Industries. Students also undertake the Major Textiles Project and individual design from one of the 5 focus areas, including apparel, furnishings, costume, textile arts or non apparel.

    • Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12 Industrial Technology (Timber)

      The Industrial Technology Timber course is designed to develop in students a knowledge and understanding of the Timber Industry. Emphasis is placed on Industry Management, Manufacturing processes and production techniques used by the Timber Industry and developed through practical applications on projects. Students will develop knowledge and skills in safe OHS practices, communicating information relevant to the Timber Industry and an appreciation of quality control principles in producing quality timber products. The Course involves an Industry Study where students observe and analyse the industrial practices of an individual business. The students then display their skills in the development, management, communications and production of a Major project worth 60% of their HSC assessment.

    • Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10 Graphics Technology

      Graphics Technology aims to develop in students the ability to think creatively, devise solutions and communicate information to a range of audiences using a variety of graphical techniques and media. Students will develop knowledge, understanding and skills to:

      • Visualise, sketch and draw objects to communicate to specific audiences
      • Design, produce and evaluate graphical presentations using manual and computer-based media.
      • Use conventions and standards to design and produce presentations
      • Apply OH&S practices to the work environment
      • Appreciate the nature and scope of graphics in industry

      Graphics Technology involves students learning skills in both manual and computer-based forms of image generation and manipulation in a variety of contexts, applied through the completion of graphical exercise and projects using hands-on manual drawing techniques and an extensive use of Computer Aided Design software.

  • VET
    • Why we study VET

      Studying a VET course will allow students to access both long-term and short-term employment opportunities. VET Courses provide an opportunity for students to gain Certificates II or III as part of their HSC. Apart from being nationally recognised, these AQF VET qualifications articulate into higher-level qualifications including those which underpin traineeship pathways, which students may pursue post-school. 

      VET courses count towards the UAI (now called ATAR) and students who perform well in their chosen course can achieve excellent marks.

      In addition, VET courses allow students to:

      Gain increased awareness of career opportunities and the labour market Have an easier transition into the world of work Gain knowledge, skills and attitudes that are relevant to and valued in the workplace Gain knowledge of employers’ expectations Develop social and communication skills through learning in an adult environment Make contacts that can lead to future job prospects

    • Construction

      Course Description

      Construction provides students with the opportunity to gain a range of skills suitable for employment in the construction industry and to provide pathways for further study. The course incorporates core units plus a range of elective units from the General Construction and Civil Construction sectors.

      A mandatory Work Cover approved general OH&S induction-training program, as well as a work activity OH&S training and site-specific OH&S training must be completed before students are allowed onto a work site.

       


      Possible Credentials

      • Statement of Attainment for Certificate II in Construction (Pathways) (CPC20208)
      • Certificate II in Construction (Pathways) (CPC20208)

      Work Placement: Students in Industry Curriculum Framework courses must complete work placement of up to 70 hours for a 2 unit x 2 year course (240 hours).

       


      Equipment Costs

      Students will need to purchase a set of protective clothing – overalls or builder’s shirt and trousers plus a pair of steel-capped boots. Prices vary.

    • Entertainment

      Course Description

      The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to gain a range of general skills and knowledge suitable for entry to employment in live production, theatre and events industries e. g. lighting, audio and stage management. This course comprises 13 compulsory units of competency and an elective pool containing 37 units of competency. 240 indicative hour courses are accredited for a total of four units at the Preliminary and/or HSC level.

      Samples of occupations students can aim for in the business services industry:

      • Sound Technician Lighting crew
      • Vision Systems controller
      • Promotions Manager
      • Company Manager
      • Development Director
      • Box Office Manager
      • Scenic Designer
      • Stage Manager
      • Stage Crew
      • Lighting Designer Electrician 

       


      Possible Credentials

      • Statement of Attainment towards Certificate III in Live Production, Theatre and Events (Technical Operations) (CUE30203)
      • Certificate III in Live Production, Theatre and Events (Technical Operations) (CUE30203)

       


      Work Placement

      Students in Industry Curriculum Framework courses must complete work placement of up to 70 hours for a 2 unit x 2 year course (240 hours).

       


      Equipment Costs

      Students will need to have a set of black t-shirt and trousers and protective footwear.

    • Hospitality

      Course Description

      Hospitality focuses on providing customer service. Skills learned can be transferred across a range of industries. Workplaces for which Hospitality competencies are required include cafes, catering organisations and resorts.

      This course involves training in skills for developing menus, managing resources, preparing, cooking and serving a range of dishes as well as supporting and working with colleagues to meet goals and provide a high level of customer service.  Samples of occupations students can aim for in the business services industry:

      • bar assistant
      • bar manager
      • chef
      • conference manager
      • events coordinator
      • food & beverage manager
      • housekeeper
      • publicity and sales manager
      • reservations clerk
      • front office receptionist
      • guest service coordinator
      • hotel/motel manager manager / owner of a small business

       


      Possible Credentials

      • Certificate I in Hospitality (SIT10207)
      • Certificate I in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations) (SIT10307)
      • Certificate II in Hospitality (SIT20207)
      • Statement of Attainment towards Cert II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations) (SIT20307)

       


      Work Placement

      Students in Industry Curriculum Framework courses must complete work placement of 70 hours for a 2 unit x 2 year course (240 hours).

       


      Equipment Costs

      Students will need to purchase a chef’s uniform as well as chef’s toolkit. Students will be fitted for their uniforms early in Term 1. Toolkits will be ordered at the same time.

    • Business Services

      Course Description

      This course is based on units of competency, which have been developed by the national business services industry to describe the competencies, skills and knowledge required by workers in the industry. The business services industry provides clerical and administrative support to commerce, industry, government and the professions. Skills gained in this industry transfer to other occupations.

      Samples of occupations students can aim for in the business services industry:

      • office manager
      •  payroll clerk/officer
      • personal assistant
      • personnel clerk
      • project manager
      • sales clerk/officer
      • secretary
      • manager/owner of a small business 

       


      Possible Credentials

      Depending on the selection and achievement of units of competency, the possible qualification outcomes are:

      • Statement of Attainment for Certificate II in Business (BSB20107)
      • Certificate II in Business (BSB20107)

       


      Work Placement

      Students in Industry Curriculum Framework courses must complete work placement of 70 hours for a 2 unit x 2 year course (240 hours).

    • Information Technology

      Course Description

      This course is based on units of competency, which have been developed by the information technology industry to describe the competencies, skills and knowledge required by workers in the industry. Students concentrate on developing a range of fundamental skills required to prepare them to work effectively in an environment where information technology is used. These include oral and written communication skills, teamwork skills, and the efficient use of a range of software application packages, essential computer hardware management and occupational health and safety competencies.

      Samples of occupations students can aim for in the business services industry:

      • desktop publisher
      • on-line service support officer
      • e-business development manager
      • programmer
      • help desk officer
      • service technician
      • Internet specialist
      • software developer
      • IT consultant
      • systems engineer
      • IT marketing manager
      • systems analyst
      • IT project manager
      • IT teacher/trainer
      • multimedia developer
      • technical support officer
      • network administrator
      • web designer

       


      Possible Credentials

      • Statement of Attainment towards Certificate III in Information Technology
      • Certificate II in Information Technology

       


      Work Placement

      Students in Industry Curriculum Framework courses must complete work placement of 70 hours for a 2 unit x 2 year course (240 hours).

  • Co-Curricular Activities & Special Programs
    • Extra-Curricular Activities

      The school is involved in a number of co-curricular activities. These include:

      • representative sport
      • college sports program, swimming classes & surf lifesaving classes
      • debating and public speaking
      • college musical
      • Tournament of Minds
      • camps and retreats
      • first aid course
      • national competitions
    • Sports

      Sport at St Patrick’s MaristCollege plays an important role in our school curriculum. It provides an opportunity for both Staff and Students to interact outside of the typical classroom setting. It is important that students still get the opportunity to interact with their peers in an environment that allows teamwork, communication and exercise.


      Click here for all information relating to sports at St Pat’s

    • College Library

      St Patrick's Marist College Library is a teaching and learning resource. Its mission is to support the College's focus on the formation of people with "strong minds and gentle hearts".

      The library provides personnel, resources and learning spaces that contribute to the teaching and learning that occurs within the College. The library is thus directly involved in the process of challenging and nurturing "each student to become an informed, thinking person who acts with the compassion of Jesus, and the reflective heart of Mary, in creating a more just world."


      Supporting learning

      The library at St Patrick’s Marist College, Dundas contributes to the teaching and learning within the College by supporting the formal and informal curriculum needs of the College. It does this by: promoting good teaching and learning practice; and by providing students, teachers, and staff with access to current, adequate, and appropriate information resources so that they may have the opportunities to develop as effective users of information. 


      Development of good teaching

      The library is committed to the development of good teaching and learning practice and to the ordered and disciplined organisation of its resources and services.

      It works in partnership with the teaching staff to create a warm and friendly environment, thereby allowing positive interaction between staff and students so that all may ultimately fulfil their full potential as people of hope and justice.


      Library Website

      Click through to our library website for:

      • Library catalog and eResources
      • Facilities
      • Loans
      • Equipment
      • Student and Teacher Resources
      • Premiers Reading Challenge
      • Recommended readings
      • Copyright free resources
      • Harvard referencing system
      • How to do a boolean search
      • How to write an essay
      • Note-taking
      • Plagiarism
      • Quoting, paraphrasing and summarising
      • Search Engines
      • Adolescent and Parenting Resources
      • HSC Online
      • Interesting Websites
      • Internet Tools
      • Useful Links
  • Subject Selection

Teaching & Learning

  • St Patrick's Marist College is  firmly focused on providing a high quality learning environment. It is proud of the academic achievements of the graduating classes and encourages each student to realise their full potential.

    The college offers a wide range of courses covering all aspects of the curriculum. This enables each student to select their studies in accordance with their individual abilities.

  • View Teaching & Learning